Friday, 16 June 2017

For All Who Have Gone "Into The Darkness"

This week was already a bit melancholy, as it was coming up on the second anniversary of my father's death. With the addition of the horrific fire in London, England, my heart is heavy.

So, today: a poem in honour of all those who are gone, no matter what the circumstances of their passing may be. I do not remember how I was introduced to this poem, but if it was through the blog of one of you, my blogger friends, I thank you.



Dirge Without Music
  
   by Edna St. Vincent Millay


I am not resigned to the shutting away of loving hearts in the hard ground.
So it is, and so it will be, for so it has been, time out of mind:
Into the darkness they go, the wise and the lovely.  Crowned
With lilies and with laurel they go; but I am not resigned.

Lovers and thinkers, into the earth with you.
Be one with the dull, the indiscriminate dust.
A fragment of what you felt, of what you knew,
A formula, a phrase remains,—but the best is lost.

The answers quick and keen, the honest look, the laughter, the love,—
They are gone.  They are gone to feed the roses.  Elegant and curled
Is the blossom.  Fragrant is the blossom.  I know.  But I do not approve.
More precious was the light in your eyes than all the roses in the world.

Down, down, down into the darkness of the grave
Gently they go, the beautiful, the tender, the kind;
Quietly they go, the intelligent, the witty, the brave.
I know.  But I do not approve.  And I am not resigned.







 *****

Back on Monday, hopefully with a lighter heart. Stay safe, everyone.


26 comments:

  1. I lost my father 57 years ago but his kindly influence has no perceptible end. I can still hear his stories, his encouragements in his voice. We are in a time of strife and agitation, but those triumphs of spirit, compassion, determination and love made by our parents are still available to us. They're there, inside.

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    1. That's true, Geo. - thank you for reminding me of that.

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  2. I'm sorry for your loss Jenny and for all those affected by the fire in London. There are brighter days ahead. It was a fitting tribute you made and a scary picture of what can happen when you least expect it to. Time is a great healer, but I hope those that lost their lives won't ever be forgotten.

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    1. It was a real tragedy because it was preventable ... I too hope the victims won't ever be forgotten. Thanks for commenting, Terry.

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  3. Beautiful poem that says what is in our hearts. Thank you.

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    1. Thanks for reading, Delores. I find this poem achingly beautiful.

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  4. I not resigned either. And yet we must accept. They a two different things I suppose. Thank you for sharing this beautiful poem.

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    1. I do believe, as you say, that they are two different things. Thanks for reading, Angella.

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  5. Thank you for sharing this profound poem. It strikes a chord for many of us. I am sorry for your loss. Two years is still raw.

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    1. Thanks, e, and you're so right: many of us can relate to it.

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  6. Take care, jenny_o, and I hope the weekend treats you well. It feels like there has been a lot of people out there with heavy hearts. We all could use a big dose of good news.

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    1. That we could, Mr. S. Thanks for coming by and have a good weekend as well.

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  7. It has been a troubled kind of week, but it had a few bright spots, on which I'm trying to focus.
    Today is my mother's birthday, I think she would have been 84. And my friend Sara gets her stitches out tomorrow from her brain surgery which seems to have been quite successful, which is a very good thing. As I just told her, I was in rehab with a guy who'd had the same sort of surgery that didn't go as well. He was in roughly the same shape that I was in, and trying to get them to approve another week of rehab.
    I happened to see him about a year later, though, and he was doing a lot better, and I hardly recognized him with all of his hair grown back...
    Lovely poem, by the way.

    -Doug in Oakland

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    1. This was my father's birthday also. When did your mom pass away?

      That's wonderful about your friend's recovery from brain surgery. I would be terrified to have someone messing around in my brain ...

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    2. My mom passed in '91. Sara had an aneurysm on her carotid artery, and I don't think she was around for the decision to operate, as she had passed out after a very bad headache. She's a very lucky girl indeed.

      -Doug in Oakland

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    3. Sara was lucky indeed. Aneurysms are dangerous beasts.

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  8. I've never read that poem. Thank you for introducing me to it. On the first Father's Day after my dad died, we got away with the kids (who were still young) to Chincoteague and Assateague Islands off Maryland and Virginia.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. That would be such a lovely trip. It would be a good way to both remember and forget, if that makes sense.

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  9. I've never seen/read this poem before. It is so hauntingly and emotionally beautiful. I'm sorry about your loss. No matter how much time passes, we ache.

    And that fire...there are no words. So much grief.

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    1. It's just so sad, to think that so many people died needlessly - they didn't stand a chance. Thanks for coming by, Martha.

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  10. There seems to be so many tragedies around us these days. It makes me sad but it also reminds me to cherish the time that I have with my loved ones, and appreciate them for who they are.

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    1. That is a very helpful reaction, Nicky. It's something we all need to remember.

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    1. That is so. Thanks for reading, John.

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  12. That is a profound poem.

    I've had a hard time with the fire, too, as well as all the other news we've had in the UK in recent months. It's a difficult period.

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    1. You've been hit hard, time after time, over there. Just know that others around the world are aware, and thinking of you and hurting with you.

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