Monday, 8 August 2016

Baby Talk

I've been finding it harder to come up with ideas for posts because I'm not getting out and about, due to the longer hours I've been working and my inability to go walking because of my sore hip.

What to do, what to do ...

Use my secret weapon, that's what. I have a bit of a packrat personality, and why should that be any different when it comes to hoarding great articles, interesting ideas, and funny videos found on the internet? I've got so many bookmarked that the list has become almost unusable. But, just like other stuff I save, occasionally I come up with a new use for the many things I've bookmarked "just in case." Whenever I need a topic, I just scan down the list of bookmarks until one jumps out at me.

Today I needed a smile, so this is the video I'd like to share:

Another use for breakfast

Apparently because it's a news feed, I can't insert the actual video. But if you click the link, it will take you there. I hope it works for my international readers.

And for those who can't or don't wish to follow the link, here is a still photo on a different topic:


This photo is pretty drab and uninteresting.

But the back story will help, I hope.

These are both crows. But the one on the left is a youngster, while the one on the right is bigger - and, I assume, older. And also, I assume, the parent. He or she was giving me the beady eye stare while I took the photo, and shortly afterward, they both took off for the nearest tree, with the parent urging the youngster to "get over here, NOW." At least that's what it sounded like.

It reminds me of the day I saw a similar parent/youngster duo when I was out for a walk. It was a quiet day and I could hear them clearly from a distance. The parent crow was making a sound I've never heard a crow make before - it was like the chirping of any ordinary small bird, not the strident and/or gutteral cawing that crows usually make. And the youngster, who was hopping about on a lawn while the parent watched from the wire above, was chirping back. I was amazed to hear this exchange. Crow baby talk? Family voice (as opposed to public voice)? Who knows? But what a treat to hear it.

12 comments:

  1. That Cheerios video is cute. And I like the bird picture, its monochrome look. It's amazing how communicative some animals are with each other!

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    1. It is - although we don't often get to see it. Walking has provided me a way to see more of it.

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  2. Just don't get distracted and add milk and sugar...

    -Doug in Oakland

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    1. Oh! You're right! Someone at the cereal place better get on that. Because eventually someone else is going to sue :)

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    2. Here is a link to a page with a video of a guy explaining crow language. He basically says that if the caws are regular and even everything is chill, but if they get erratic and uneven, there's probably crow trouble about.

      http://www.nature-mentor.com/crow-language.html#.V6kkj61oy-c

      -Doug in Oakland

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    3. I've often wondered whether the number of caws they repeat means something or not. Interesting website by that young man.

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  3. Those poor babies. Toast crumbs in the bedclothes are soooo irritating, and I assume that cereal is worse.
    I am endlessly fascinated by watching birds (and cats) interact. Pecking order isn't an idle phrase. And the day we saw a parent (we think) galah rap a whinging youngster on the head will stay in our memories. The galah youngster was quiet for the first time in what seemed like hours...

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    1. Let's hope the dads were as diligent about changing the bedclothes as they were about building towers, EC.

      And how extraordinary to catch a parent bird disciplining a youngster! And, actually, now that I think about it, to catch a youngster misbehaving. You'd think that being whiny/whingy would be a ticket to an early date with a predator, and therefore not usually an issue. I do love the visual of the parent finally losing patience :)

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  4. I sure like this post. I've heard crows murmur among themselves, but only when I've been very patient and sat still. Otherwise they are full of raucous hilarity. Especially impressed with doves and quail too. They really do keep sentries up to caution those gathering food or nest material on the ground.

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    1. There are a lot of things we can learn if we are very patient and sit still, as you say. So often we just don't take (or make) time for it.

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  5. Love those babies and their little Cheeriod faces. I can't add much to the conversation in the way of crow talk, but it seems reasonable to me that they would have a family conversation voice, maybe even baby talk.

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    1. It does seem reasonable, and yet it never occurred to me until I actually heard it!

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