Friday, 29 July 2016

Five Excuses, and Only One Is Valid

It's been awhile since I've gotten out for a good walk.

Why?

First, in mid-summer, town sidewalks feel like this:


Second, after thirty seconds or less, it feels like this is running down my back:


Third, my right hip feels like this (without the flowers):


Fourth, my To Do list looks like this:


Fifth, my energy level looks like this:


Did you spot the valid excuse?

The hip. I can find a way around all of these roadblocks except the hip. My bursitis was triggered by sitting for long hours in an uncomfortable chair at work a couple of weeks ago. I've been resting it as much as I can and hopefully I'll be back to my walks soon.

I can hardly wait.

And I can hardly believe I'm saying that. What started out as just a way to get exercise has become so much more, to the point where I get cranky when I can't get out. I guess that's good - not the cranky part, but the enjoyment part.

How about you? Have you ever started doing something because it was good for you, and then realized you had come to like it a lot?


19 comments:

  1. I feel that way about my weekly session with the trainer. If I miss, I know it.

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    1. Yep. It might not be easy, but it's good, right?

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  2. Totally. After my stroke, I had (at least) two areas to focus on: 1)Regaining function, and 2)Getting healthy enough to beat the odds and not have another stroke.
    On the function side, I was lucky, as I was living in a warehouse space with a workout area, and soon there was a treadmill (which never really worked for me) and an elliptical trainer, which I worked out on six times a day for three years. I also did a lot of walking, which has been the main focus of my recovery, and I still do ten laps in the back yard to this day. And as you said, if I don't get to it (heavy rain, scheduling conflicts) I miss it. A lot. I also have a 17 pound hand-sized barbell I do curls and presses with daily, to keep the muscles on my left side from atrophying any more than they have, and that makes me feel better and more able, as when I started, I couldn't even get it up off of my left shoulder.
    Then there's my diet.
    I don't smoke, drink, or do drugs, and that part hasn't been hard at all, but I was afraid my taste for salt and sugar would do me in. But guess what? I don't even like salt any more. It's strange, without trying to curtail my sodium intake, I did it anyway, by not having an appetite for salt any more. I don't really dislike it, but I don't add it to my food (the people I cook for have learned to add their own if they want it) and three or four potato chips and I'm good. Sugar doesn't have the same kind of appeal for me that it used to, and I find I not only don't miss it, but I feel better without so much of it. My one remaining vice is strawberry soda, and if my blood test comes back OK for blood sugar, my doctor says it's OK for me to drink it. Wow, that turned into a rant about my health instead of a description of things I like to do that started out as task-oid items, but they sort of feel that way to me, so I hope you understand.

    -Doug in Oakland

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    1. Not a rant at all - I really think those are all things that start out as "shoulds," and if you can move forward to enjoying them, that's so much better than having to force yourself to do them. I am so impressed with your commitment and how well you've come back from your stroke. I wish I could lose my taste for salt ... there are so many foods I can't eat due to GI issues that I turn to salt as a seasoning, I'm afraid. Did you just lose your desire for it due to the stroke, or from eating healthier?

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    2. I just started noticing when I was eating a lot of it, and it didn't feel good. It's not so much that I avoid it, it's more that I don't seem to be hungry for it.

      -Doug in Oakland

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    3. Maybe I need to start being more aware of how salt and sugar make me feel. I've done that with some foods (fatty/greasy ones) so I understand what you mean.

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  3. Bursitis is decidedly unfriendly isn't it? I hope yours eases off quickly.
    And you have reminded me that this white whale needs to get back in the pool. Something I have been promising myself for too long.

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    1. I didn't realize it was bursitis (different bursa from last time) until I tried to "work it out" by walking and made it worse. How is yours? Swimming would be good because the water supports one, yes? I hope you get a chance to go soon. And picture yourself as a dolphin instead, one with a big smile :)

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    2. Swimming is good. Not least because it is an exercise I can do without overheating. My bursitis is quiet at the moment. For which I am grateful. I did find that the exercise where you lie on your back and pull the affected knee towards your chest helped. Scary as it sounds.

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    3. I realize after reading your comment that I've forgotten some of the exercises I was given last time I had this - thanks for that. I need to go find them now and make sure I'm doing them all. Glad your bursitis is behaving.

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  4. Fingers crossed that you get back to your walks soon. Take care.

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    1. I will be a happier person when that time comes, Mr. S. Thanks :)

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  5. Today I lifted a piece of statuary, a concrete goose --maybe 60 pounds-- carried it out to the car. Then the goose's head fell off. Haven't decided which of us was damaged more. My lower back muscles are now trying to climb out and demand to know what I was thinking. I'm now determined to exercise, but must respect my aging body. Thanks for this helpful and cautionary post. I'll take it slow and maybe get mighty again.

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    1. Oh, ouch, Geo. ... yes, respect is definitely necessary if we don't want to make things even worse. It's hard to be patient, though. My condolences to you and to the goose.

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  6. Like you, I'm a walker, and in the past, a devoted runner but not so much anymore. I like being outside and getting to know my neighbourhood. Recently, I've shown an interest in the backyard, my husband's domain. I think it's thrown him for a loop. I don't know if he likes it or resents it. He wasn't crazy about my "cutting back the ivy" on the side of the house, though. I got carried away and it all had to come down. Oops. I think it looks better, though. We can always grow more.

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    1. Hah! Ivy is impossible to kill, so you're probably good. Reminds me of the time I pruned the shrubs in front of our house. My husband still talks about it. But it looked great the next year! Honest! Sometimes you just have to hit the reset button.

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    2. I'm sure your shrubs looked great and I'll bet our ivy will come back much greener and less scary and footy looking, too.

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  7. To answer your last question
    Eating scotch eggs......
    What?
    They are not good for you?
    Oh bloody hell

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